‘Ken. To be destroyed’ – exhibition explores trans identity in 1950’s Britain

This spring, an intriguing new exhibition launches as part of LGBT History Month that seeks to explore transgender identity in 1950’s Britain through archival family photographs of the artist.

The show recounts the extraordinary story of Hazel and Ken Houston, as told by their niece, artist Sarah Davidmann. Combining both original archive material with new work from Davidmann, ‘Ken. To be destroyed’ is in part curated by the faculty at the University of the Arts, London College of Communications (LCC).

‘Ken. To be destroyed’ began as a discovery after Davidmann and her sister inherited letters and photographs from her mother belonging to her uncle and aunt (Ken and Hazel). The envelope containing the archives was marked ‘Ken. To be destroyed’. It later emerged that after they had married, Hazel discovered that Ken was transgender.

The exhibition, which is part of the Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research, will run Wednesday 17 February – Saturday 26 March 2017 and will be accompanied by a series of events, talks and workshops.

London College of Communication (LCC) presents Ken. To be destroyed as part of its public programme of events and exhibitions. The exhibition, which is part of the Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research, will run Wednesday 17 February – Saturday 26 March 2017 and will be accompanied by a series of events, talks and workshops.

‘Ken. To be destroyed’ launches 16 February during LGBT History Month @ arts.ac.uk/lcc

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Ahmed Elmi

Editor-in-Chief

Ahmed has worked extensively in lifestyle editorial, writing for magazines like Esquire UK, and has also worked as a digital copywriter for numerous brands that include, L’Oreal, British Airways, and Pernod Ricard. Tweet him @ahmednelmi or send him a nice story: ahmed.elmi@theechelon.co.uk